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<  Music  ~  Charlie?

cholla76
Posted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 4:56 pm Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 26 Oct 2005 Posts: 133
In some shows from 01' I am hearing a lot about this "Charlie" character who I assume used to be apart of the band... any of you old school fans care to share what part he played in the history of the band? What happened to him? all i know is the boy liked his biscuits........
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Jane
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:26 am Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 24 Oct 2006 Posts: 138 Location: Ohio
Hey Cholla, did you go to the Louisville show??
I don't know who Charlie is, but isn't he the guy they're talking to at the beginning of Shack #9?
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therodge
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:30 am Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6546 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
They used to call each other Charlie alot on stage.... I'm 99% positive they got that onstage banter from listening to old recordings of Charlie Poole. You should check him out! He was a wild man. He once wrapped his banjo around a policeman's neck... so saith the liner notes, haha!


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cholla76
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:59 am Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 26 Oct 2005 Posts: 133
No Jane, i could not make it to the Louisville show and was really bummed about it... did you?
rodge- thanks for clearing that up for me and for the intro to charlie poole, i will be sure and check him out.... cheers!
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bopanic
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 12:46 pm Reply with quote
*King of da Vuld* Joined: 04 Dec 2005 Posts: 4190 Location: Nashville, TN
wondering who charlie was at the begining of shack #9. rodge you know to damn much! ha

yeah i gotta check mr poole out to. sounds like a mad man! ha
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therodge
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:23 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6546 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
nah, I didn't make the connection until a few months ago. Brodank put that Charlie Poole box set on the "Now Playing" topic... so, I told my friend about it and he got it for me for my birthday. So I gave it a listen and they were all about some "Hey there, Charlie! Well hello there, Charlie". Ketch sings Frankie&Johnny just like Charlie Poole too. Sorta in that Vaudville announcer voice. haha. Funny stuff.

Something else that is in the liner notes. Charlie Poole was dared by his pitching friend that he couldn't catch a fast ball bare-handed. Wild man that he was, he took the bet. Needless to say he broke is hand all up.... but supposedly developed a whole new banjo picking style because of it. A wild man I tell yuns!

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MikeyOutToSea
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:39 pm Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 27 Jun 2006 Posts: 603 Location: Nashvegas, TN
i say good god!

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bopanic
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:13 pm Reply with quote
*King of da Vuld* Joined: 04 Dec 2005 Posts: 4190 Location: Nashville, TN
damn that just sounds painful! like jumping off a bridge and landing on a bike with no seat.
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Simon
Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:34 pm Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 04 Oct 2006 Posts: 508 Location: The Otherside
You can hear a 'charly' on a Hackensaw Boys live recording too.
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foxontherun
Posted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 11:57 am Reply with quote
*Call Me Foxxxy If'n Ya Nasty* Joined: 18 Dec 2004 Posts: 1079 Location: Lynchburg, VA USA
ya know, wasn't charlie also the short term mandolin/bones/guitar player..ya know the sixth member in eutaw

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The Fox
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swampjustice
Posted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:23 pm Reply with quote
Tearin' it Down Joined: 09 Aug 2005 Posts: 191 Location: Tennessee
Sam Kinman/kinmen was his name I think...talked about eggs and biscuits a lot...literally, I'm sure. They mention him in the No Depression article
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therodge
Posted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 1:36 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6546 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
You mean Matt Kinman?

http://www.myspace.com/mattkinmanthelittlehobo

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swampjustice
Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 1:09 pm Reply with quote
Tearin' it Down Joined: 09 Aug 2005 Posts: 191 Location: Tennessee
Yup.
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JugBlowr
Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:00 am Reply with quote
Lil' Birdie Joined: 23 Feb 2007 Posts: 8 Location: Star City, VA
Yes folks, Charlie Poole was quite a character. And a legendary singer, banjo picker and consumer of alcohol. There are still some folks around who remember Charlie coming around to visit, until the homebrew was all gone.

If you want to read a great book about Charlie Poole, and lots of other music going on in his day, check out Kinney Rorrer's excellent book, Ramblin' Blues, here: http://www.countysales.com/php-bin/ecomm4/products.php?category_id=&product_id=4242&prev_id=3830&next_id=4241
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Kitty
Posted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 2:02 pm Reply with quote
*Mrs. Kitty* Joined: 23 Oct 2006 Posts: 2344 Location: Durham, NC
Charlie Poole in the Country Music Hall of Fame??

http://www.wral.com/news/state/story/8333346/

Greensboro, N.C. — When one of the guys joking around with Charlie Poole told him he knew of a better banjo player, Poole replied that he could outstrum the man – upside down.

Then he proceeded to do just that.

“He put himself on his hands and put his feet (against the wall) to brace himself, and he played that banjo standing on his head,” said Kinney Rorrer, a retired college history teacher whose great-uncle played in a band with Poole in the 1920s.

Poole, of the Spray community in Eden, died in 1931 at 39. But his music lives on – notably in the concert “An Evening with Loudon Wainwright III.”

Wainwright won this year’s Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album. The album celebrates Poole’s music.

Proceeds from the Sept. 25 concert will benefit Piedmont Folk Legacies’ effort to save the historic Nantucket Mill and turn it into the National Banjo Center and to help Governor Morehead Park. Tickets must be bought in advance.

“It’s such an honor to have someone of his stature to want to do something for us,” Louise Price, co-founder of the annual Charlie Poole Music Festival, said of Wainwright’s free performance. “He wants to do this for Poole’s town.”

Poole grew up in a cotton mill family in Randolph County. But playing the banjo, something he took a liking to as a boy, soon beat working a regular job. By 22, he had begun rambling with his banjo, making music and drinking wherever he went.

About 1918, he met Rorrer’s great uncle, a fiddler named Posey Rorrer, who eventually brought him back to Spray. That’s where he fell in love with Posey Rorrer’s sister.

“Lou Emma had to deal with a man who she loved who was so unreliable,” said Kinney Rorrer, who grew up in Eden and also is the author of “Ramblin’ Blues: The Life and Songs of Charlie Poole.” He is a member of the New North Carolina Ramblers, which is the opening act for Wainwright’s concert.

“He would leave home and be gone months at a time, and she would have no idea where he was,” Rorrer said.

Soon, Poole, Posey Rorrer and a guitar player from Spray named Norman Woodlieff were touring through the hills of Virginia and fiddler conventions in Tennessee and West Virginia.

In 1925, Poole’s group recorded for Columbia Records. A record that sold 20,000 was considered a hit. When Poole’s first record – “Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down Blues/Can I Sleep In Your Barn Tonight, Mister?” – came out in September 1925, it sold 102,000 copies and was deemed the first country megahit.

A second record sold more than 65,000 copies. At the time, only an estimated 600,000 phonographs had been sold in the South, according to Rorrer.

“It encouraged the record companies to seek out more rural talent,” he said.

Poole became one of the first major country music stars. A case can be made that he was the first, according to country music historians.

But the stock market crash of 1929 changed everything, and afterward, nobody could sell records.

Poole continued to ramble.

Sometimes he ended up in a place where he wasn’t popular, and he’d send Lou Emma a telegram asking for money to come home. Otherwise, he was a free spirit, often catching rides and going wherever the car was headed.

“He lived as he wanted, and not many people can say that,” Rorrer said.

By 1931, however, he was back at the mills in Spray. There, he drank himself to death. It’s written on his death certificate.

“He is an example of a man who was extraordinarily talented but burned out very quickly, like a shooting star,” Rorrer said.

Even with talent and a life that played out as a heartbreaking country song, the country music pioneer has never made it into the Country Music Hall of Fame – something Wainwright is trying to change by keeping Poole’s music alive.

Many of Poole’s tunes were recorded by performers such as Joan Baez, who would become more famous than Poole. John Mellencamp recorded the popular “White House Blues.” The Grateful Dead recorded “Don’t Let the Deal Go Down.” Even the first chapter of Bob Dylan’s autobiography mentions Charlie Poole.

“He never had an advocate to push for it,” Rorrer said.

The first Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, Jimmie Rodgers, who recorded two years after Poole, had legends Ernest Tubb and Gene Autry pushing for him. One of the daughters of Mother Maybelle of The Carter Family – the first vocal group to become country music stars – married Johnny Cash.

“Charlie died during the worst years of the Depression, and people moved on,” Rorrer said. “I think he kind of fell between the cracks.”

They all deserved the honor, he said.

“To me, Charlie’s music is modern music,” Price said, wondering aloud if maybe the push should instead be for an induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “It’s the foundation for everything we hear today in modern music.”

In 2005, Columbia Records released the box set “You Ain’t Talkin’ to Me: Charlie Poole and the Roots of Country Music.”

“He listened to vaudeville, he listened to ragtime and tin pan alley. He listened to everything, including the classical music influence from the music teacher at the mill,” Price said about Poole’s sound. “He took all of it, and it went into him and came out something new.”

Now, people come from all over the world to visit his grave in the old Spray Cemetery.

“I had a guy who came here from Germany three or four years ago,” Rorrer said. “He had been to a jazz festival in New Orleans. He also loved Charlie Poole’s music.”

Rorrer, who had written the book by then, agreed to take him to the grave. Before going, however, the man asked to make one stop.

“He brought flowers to put on Charlie Poole’s grave,” Rorrer said. “I was touched that he wanted to do that. (Charlie) had fans all over the place.”
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therodge
Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 1:02 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6546 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Matt Kinman has a Kickstarter for a documentary he's making

CHECKITOUT

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LucyStag
Posted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 1:57 am Reply with quote
*Cruel Lucille* Joined: 20 Mar 2008 Posts: 1022 Location: Dunno
Ugh, more projects I wish I had done first. I had a book in mine that similar...

This sounds awesome, though.

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therodge
Posted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:36 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6546 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Matt Kinman's first episode of "The Back Porch of America"

http://youtu.be/LuT5t1xBIvQ

I'm really looking forward to the next one. Very well done

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LucyStag
Posted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 9:50 pm Reply with quote
*Cruel Lucille* Joined: 20 Mar 2008 Posts: 1022 Location: Dunno
Ooh! Excited to watch, and assuming I will be peeved I didn't do it first. Very Happy

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