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cholla76
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 8:58 am Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 26 Oct 2005 Posts: 133



Has anyone seen this series? It's fucking brilliant! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0WqG3zGoDQ

Especially when they break into a song.... Hysterical! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bqxnm6t3QMw


Last edited by cholla76 on Fri Aug 03, 2007 7:34 am; edited 1 time in total
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therodge
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:48 am Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6539 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Good Idea, cholla76!

BAD ICE!



2 classics!



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motiger
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:53 am Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 26 Aug 2005 Posts: 80 Location: Missouri
Just let your SOUL GLOW....

I love Coming to America. And I think it is on TNT or TBS just about every weekend. Its amazing.
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motiger
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:56 am Reply with quote
Raisin' a Ruckus Joined: 26 Aug 2005 Posts: 80 Location: Missouri
Because my husband and I are HUGE geeks, we are watching this most evenings...

http://www.history.com/minisites/citiesoftheunderworld

Its quite addictive. That and: http://dsc.discovery.com/fansites/manvswild/manvswild.html

And I am literally counting down the minutes until the "Bourne Ultimatum" comes out. I am so excited. And not because it has Matt Damon in it, noooo that has nothing to do with it.
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DeanRogers
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:13 am Reply with quote
Charlie Joined: 06 Jul 2006 Posts: 896 Location: Ocean City, MD
I have become hooked on watching a show on Discovery Home, Holmes on Homes, this builder guy goes around fixing other peoples work...good stuff if you are into that sort of thing, best part is they are Canadian, so you get to hear em saying "eh..." a bunch. if you are doing renovations watch this show to figure out the wrong and right way to do various things around your place.

http://www.holmesonhomes.com/

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brodank
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:40 am Reply with quote
Guest Joined: 13 Dec 2004 Posts: 1656
cholla76 wrote:



Has anyone seen this series? It's fucking brillant! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0WqG3zGoDQ

Especially when they break into a song.... Hysterical! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bqxnm6t3QMw


that stuff is funny, never even heard of it before
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pittsyltucky
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:53 am Reply with quote
*Johnny* Joined: 15 Sep 2006 Posts: 4268 Location: Pigg River District, Pittsylvania County, Virginia
Seen a few episodes of "Flight" -- some hysterical, some not so funny. I love their "Business Time" song...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GpTTf175aE
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jkorp
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 11:20 am Reply with quote
Charlie Joined: 22 Feb 2007 Posts: 976 Location: The Right Coast
cholla76 wrote:



Has anyone seen this series? It's fucking brillant! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0WqG3zGoDQ

Especially when they break into a song.... Hysterical! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bqxnm6t3QMw




".....wear your freaky eye patch"

"....why can't a heterosexual guy tell a heterosexual guy that he thinks his booty is fly"

That is some funny shite.

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brodank
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 11:29 am Reply with quote
Guest Joined: 13 Dec 2004 Posts: 1656
http://tv-links.co.uk/listings/1

RENO911
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gwrap
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 1:06 pm Reply with quote
Charlie Joined: 28 Oct 2004 Posts: 888 Location: Stankonia, GA
brodank wrote:
cholla76 wrote:



Has anyone seen this series? It's fucking brillant! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0WqG3zGoDQ

Especially when they break into a song.... Hysterical! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bqxnm6t3QMw


that stuff is funny, never even heard of it before


Kind of looks like you too, brodank. maybe it's just the beard and the guitar...

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brodank
Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 1:29 pm Reply with quote
Guest Joined: 13 Dec 2004 Posts: 1656
gwrap wrote:
brodank wrote:
cholla76 wrote:



Has anyone seen this series? It's fucking brillant! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0WqG3zGoDQ

Especially when they break into a song.... Hysterical! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bqxnm6t3QMw


that stuff is funny, never even heard of it before


Kind of looks like you too, brodank. maybe it's just the beard and the guitar...


whats even funnier is i own that same red shirt...seriously...i got it from Target
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Simon
Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 7:00 am Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 04 Oct 2006 Posts: 508 Location: The Otherside
motiger wrote:


And I am literally counting down the minutes until the "Bourne Ultimatum" comes out. I am so excited. And not because it has Matt Damon in it, noooo that has nothing to do with it.


I do, how weird would it be without Matt Damon in it..
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bopanic
Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 4:14 pm Reply with quote
*King of da Vuld* Joined: 04 Dec 2005 Posts: 4190 Location: Nashville, TN
i love flight of the concords!

those guys actually write all their own music, they have been on letterman and leno already, that show is GREAT!

by the way good to see ya back round the board cholla!
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jkorp
Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 11:14 pm Reply with quote
Charlie Joined: 22 Feb 2007 Posts: 976 Location: The Right Coast
I am catching up on FOTC episodes on On Demand this weekend.

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Simon
Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2007 7:50 am Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 04 Oct 2006 Posts: 508 Location: The Otherside
thanks!
I didn't knew this..
so funny http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlYkIJVguCU
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rlove3
Posted: Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:53 pm Reply with quote
*Mr. Lehman* Joined: 26 Oct 2006 Posts: 1102 Location: Asheville, NC
i got the new flaming lips ufo's at the zoo live dvd today, and it kicks arse!

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therodge
Posted: Wed Aug 22, 2007 11:21 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6539 Location: Nashville, Tennessee


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kg
Posted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:07 pm Reply with quote
*Data Miner* Joined: 30 Jun 2007 Posts: 3427
"Into the Wild." Release date September 21. The only movie I'll be seeing at the theater this year.

Movie Web site: http://www.intothewild.com/
Trailer on You Tube: LINK

Songs by Eddie Vedder, which should be interesting.

Film based on a real-life story. Inspiring, heartbreaking, unbearably tragic, aggravating. I can't wait!
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rlove3
Posted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:35 pm Reply with quote
*Mr. Lehman* Joined: 26 Oct 2006 Posts: 1102 Location: Asheville, NC
i read that book this spring, and it was amazing...one minute your captivated bt his convictions the next your sadend by his situation, pissed because of his arrogance, oh the list goes on. and the vedder stuff should be cool too.

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BrownEyesBlue
Posted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 10:07 am Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 10 Aug 2006 Posts: 376
kg wrote:
"Into the Wild." Release date September 21. The only movie I'll be seeing at the theater this year.

Film based on a real-life story. Inspiring, heartbreaking, unbearably tragic, aggravating. I can't wait!



Whoa, I just finished reading that book last week. It wasn't till I got home that I saw the sticker on the cover that said NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE. It was a good book although it got boring a couple of times. I just love reading books about hitchhikers and travelers and things like that. And the fact that it's all real is even better.
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kg
Posted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 11:39 am Reply with quote
*Data Miner* Joined: 30 Jun 2007 Posts: 3427
From the NYT.

September 16, 2007
Mother Nature’s Restless Sons
By CHARLES McGRATH

IN the spring of 1992, after vagabonding around the country for two years, Christopher McCandless, a 24-year-old Virginian and Emory graduate, hitchhiked to Alaska and set off into the wilderness with little more than a .22-caliber rifle and a 10-pound sack of rice. Not far from the Teklanika River, he set up camp in an abandoned International Harvester bus, a 1940s relic of the Fairbanks City Transit System. He lived there for four months, from late April to late August, before finally starving to death. When his body was discovered in September, he weighed only 67 pounds.

Exactly what happened is something of a mystery. Some Alaskans believe that Mr. McCandless was a hopeless tenderfoot with no business being alone in the wild. Others speculate that Mr. McCandless, who had burned or given away all his money, cut himself off from his family and renamed himself Alexander Supertramp, was mentally unbalanced.

Jon Krakauer, in his best-selling book about Mr. McCandless, “Into the Wild,” argues that he had sufficient skills to survive but might have inadvertently poisoned himself by eating the seeds of the wild potato plant. Mr. Krakauer’s book also suggests that, far from being deranged, Mr. McCandless was a hero in the tradition of Jack London and Thoreau: a solitary quester, an explorer of his own interior landscape, in search of a more authentic relation to the natural world.

The Krakauer view has prevailed among a small band of pilgrims who over the years have visited the bus and made it an informal shrine, keeping everything there much as Mr. McCandless left it and adding their own written tributes. The place, 22 miles from the nearest road, is apt to become a full-fledged tourist attraction after the opening next week of “Into the Wild,” a deeply affecting movie version of the Krakauer book, with cinematography so beautiful it makes the Alaskan landscape seem seductively otherworldy.

The movie was written and directed, and even partly filmed, by Sean Penn, who invested the project with some of the same testy singleness of purpose he has recently brought to his political activism, his reporting stints in Iran and Iraq, his jeep tour of Venezuela with Hugo Chávez. That Hollywood might not be wild for a movie about a guy who slowly turns himself into a cadaver did not deter Mr. Penn for an instant.

“The place is like nature on steroids,” he said in July, recalling the first time he visited the bus and its surroundings. This was at a dinner given by Paramount, the movie’s distributor. Earlier, Mr. Penn, wearing a dark suit and tie, his hair brushed back in a bristle, had introduced a screening of “Into the Wild,” and watching other people watch it made him so nervous that he kept ducking out for a smoke.
He was still tinkering with the film, he said, after cutting it from almost five hours to two and a half. People who had seen a version just a month earlier said this one was already subtly but significantly different.

It took Mr. Penn years to get the film made, and in many respects the process became a mirror of Mr. McCandless’s own stubborn quest. Mr. Krakauer’s book has an autobiographical section in which he says that he was drawn to Mr. McCandless’s story because as a young man he too was a solitary, rebellious risk-taker.

Mr. Penn has left out the Krakauer reflections, but in talking about the movie he every now and then manifests an almost ornery intensity. You sense that he also saw — or wanted to see — a kind of alter ego in Mr. McCandless, someone who refused to conform to the system and embraced the world on his own terms.

Mr. Penn read “Into the Wild” not long after it came out in 1996, he said recently over the phone, and when he reached the last page, he turned back and started all over again. Right away he knew he wanted to film it. “If you want to know what it was about the book that hit me, I don’t mean to sound catty, but that’s what the movie is all about,” he said a little impatiently.

He was not the only filmmaker interested, and like the others he approached both Mr. Krakauer and Christopher McCandless’s parents, Walt and Billie, who were understandably ambivalent about the idea of a movie based on their son. In the book the McCandlesses come across as an unhappy, frequently quarrelsome couple, of whom their son angrily disapproved. One of the things that caused Christopher to break with his parents, it turns out, was his discovery that his father had not only been married before, but also had had another child with his first wife after Christopher was born.

Mr. Penn was eventually chosen among the suitors. He said he thought he “had an advantage over the others because I never mentioned money.” Then, just as he was preparing to fly to Virginia to complete the deal, Billie McCandless got cold feet. “It all came down to a dream she’d had,” Mr. Penn explained. “All of a sudden she didn’t want to be part of it.”

It was 10 years before she changed her mind, and during that time Mr. Penn had to abandon his original casting plan. He had imagined Leonardo DiCaprio as Mr. McCandless and Marlon Brando as Ronald Franz, a retired Army man and widower whom Mr. McCandless befriended shortly before leaving for Alaska. In the movie Hal Holbrook portrays Mr. Franz, and Mr. McCandless is played by Emile Hirsch, who had to lose 40 pounds — almost a quarter of his body weight — to appear sufficiently skeletal at the end.

He also had to shoot rapids in a kayak, something he had never tried before; float naked in a freezing stream; and not flinch when an enormous grizzly passed within inches of him. (The bear was supposedly trained, but there were sharpshooters on the set just in case.) Besides physical stamina, Mr. Hirsch brings to the part a kind of loopy charm, in one scene talking directly to an apple he’s eating, and the performance suggests that Mr. McCandless might have been less of a weirdo than an innocent, even a secular saint of sorts, who had a transforming effect on the people he met in his wanderings.

To make the movie, Mr. Penn installed a replica of the bus in the Alaskan town of Cantwell, about 50 miles from where Mr. McCandless died, and took some other liberties with the book. But not many. The movie is in most ways painstakingly faithful to Mr. McCandless’s story, and to how he must have seen Alaska. The film marshals an immense cast of wildlife, some trained, some not: eagles, moose, bears, reindeer, wolves, bugs and even maggots.

From the beginning Mr. Penn was determined that the movie needed to be shot entirely on location. With breaks because of weather and for Mr. Hirsch to diet, filming took eight months. The crew in effect retraced Mr. McCandless’s journey, traveling to the Gulf of California; to Carthage, N.D., where Mr. McCandless worked for a while harvesting grain; to the Grand Canyon; the Arizona desert; the Salton Sea in the California desert; and a weird place known as the Slabs, near Niland, Calif., where drifters and wanderers live on the concrete foundations of an abandoned airbase.

There are documentary-like scenes of threshers harvesting wheat, of cars barreling past on the highway, of trains clanking through rail yards. More even than the book, the movie takes on the quality of the epic American road trip — of Steinbeck and Kerouac discovering the heartland — and Mr. Penn and his crew appear to have caught the bug themselves.

“I was really glad not to be the logistician on this,” he said. “It was a very difficult shoot, and I had a lot of unusual demands.” Probably even harder than being the logistician was being the banker. At one point the production ran short of funds, and Mr. Penn had to kick in some of his own, though he was at pains to say that the studio had been extraordinarily supportive.

Mr. Penn also did a lot of his own camera work, standing waist deep in water sometimes, and the look of “Into the Wild,” whose cinematographer was Eric Gautier, owes something to two Penn mentors, Terrence Malick (who directed him in “The Thin Red Line”) and Clint Eastwood ( who directed him in “Mystic River”).

Wherever possible, to add authenticity, he included real people in his scenes. The naked hippies cavorting near the Slabs are genuine naked hippies. The beatific preacher who takes Mr. Hirsch and Mr. Holbrook to his hilltop shrine, is a well-known local figure, so caught up in his sermonizing that he may not have fully comprehended that he was appearing in a movie. In one of the most affecting scenes, Christopher is about to call home from a pay phone but winds up giving his last quarter to an elderly gent who appears to have an even more urgent need to get in touch with his estranged family. The older man is played, with winning directness, by a local man Mr. Penn discovered one night in a casino.

A scene Mr. Penn cared about a lot was one in which Christopher kayaks through some rapids in the Grand Canyon on his way to the Gulf of California. In the book Mr. McCandless paddles a canoe, not a kayak, and puts in below the last stretch of rapids. But Mr. Penn thought that kayaking through white water would demonstrate the character’s feeling of exhilaration and adventure, his almost mystical belief in his own abilities.

That Mr. Hirsch had never done such a thing and was scared half to death only made it better. To reassure Mr. Hirsch that he wouldn’t drown, and perhaps to assert his own physical self, Mr. Penn shot though the rapids first, even though he too had never done it before. Describing this part of the filming over dinner, he made it sound a lot like Outward Bound.

The music for the film was also Mr. Penn’s idea. “I deliberately underwrote parts of the script because I felt that the music and the lyrics would tell part of the story,” he said. “I liked a lot the way that works in ‘The Graduate’ and in Hal Ashby movies like ‘Harold and Maude.’ ”

His original notion was to use several different singer-songwriters, but while watching Mr. Hirsch’s performance, he said, he started hearing Eddie Vedder’s voice. He showed a rough cut to Mr. Vedder, who responded with a score that is big and soulful. It plays in the background during what is perhaps the movie’s oddest feature: chapter headings that appear periodically, as if in an old-fashioned novel (“Chapter 3: Manhood”).

Mr. Penn said he had debated about whether or not to use flashbacks and voice-overs (he employs both, and also quotations from Mr. McCandless’s journals), but he knew from the beginning that he wanted the headings. “What moved me about the story was I felt this kid had furnished himself with a very full life in a short time.” he said. “He lived all the chapters, in a way that very few people do.”
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rlove3
Posted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:38 pm Reply with quote
*Mr. Lehman* Joined: 26 Oct 2006 Posts: 1102 Location: Asheville, NC
nice article kg, can't wiat to see that movie.

as for me i just got done watching disc 1 of deadwood season 3.

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pittsyltucky
Posted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:58 am Reply with quote
*Johnny* Joined: 15 Sep 2006 Posts: 4268 Location: Pigg River District, Pittsylvania County, Virginia
And Deadwood pretty much RULES!!!!!! HBO's series are fairly lacking these days -- gone to Showtime... Weeds is really getting good in this third season and I am totally addicted to Californication now.
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kg
Posted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 5:19 pm Reply with quote
*Data Miner* Joined: 30 Jun 2007 Posts: 3427
I know I'm overdoing it, but I just had to include one more review. (At least I found out by posting here that Deadwood is worth watching!)

Movie Review
Into the Wild (2007)

September 21, 2007
Following His Trail to Danger and Joy
By A. O. SCOTT
Published: September 21, 2007

There is plenty of sorrow to be found in “Into the Wild,” Sean Penn’s adaptation of the nonfiction bestseller by Jon Krakauer. The story begins with an unhappy family, proceeds through a series of encounters with the lonely and the lost, and ends in a senseless, premature death. But though the film’s structure may be tragic, its spirit is anything but. It is infused with an expansive, almost giddy sense of possibility, and it communicates a pure, unaffected delight in open spaces, fresh air and bright sunshine.

Some of this exuberance comes from Christopher Johnson McCandless, the young adventurer whose footloose life and gruesome fate were the subject of Mr. Krakauer’s book. As Mr. Penn understands him (and as he is portrayed, with unforced charm and brisk intelligence, by Emile Hirsch), Chris is at once a troubled, impulsive boy and a brave and dedicated spiritual pilgrim. He does not court danger but rather stumbles across it — thrillingly and then fatally — on the road to joy.

In letters to his friends, parts of which are scrawled across the screen in bright yellow capital letters, he revels in the simple beauty of the natural world. Adopting the pseudonym Alexander Supertramp, rejecting material possessions and human attachments, he proclaims himself an “aesthetic voyager.”

Mr. Penn serves as both his biographer and his traveling companion. After graduating from Emory University in 1990, Mr. McCandless set off on a zigzagging two-year journey that took him from South Dakota to Southern California, from the Sea of Cortez to the Alaskan wilderness, where he perished, apparently from starvation, in August 1992. “Into the Wild,” which Mr. Penn wrote and directed, follows faithfully in his footsteps, and it illuminates the young man’s personality by showing us the world as he saw it.

What he mostly saw was the glory of the North American landscape west of the Mississippi: the ancient woodlands of the Pacific Northwest, the canyons and deserts farther south, the wheat fields of the northern prairie and Alaska, a place that Mr. McCandless seemed to regard with almost mystical reverence. Mr. Penn, who did some of the camera work, was aided by the director of photography, Eric Gautier, who previously turned his careful, voracious eye on the wilds of South America in Walter Salles’s “Motorcycle Diaries.” That movie, like “Into the Wild,” finds epic resonance in a tale of youthful wandering and proposes that a trek through mountains, rivers and forests can also be a voyage of self-discovery.

Mr. Salles’s film, in which Gael García Bernal played Che Guevara, found a political dimension in its hero’s journey. And while Chris’s fierce rejection of his parents’ middle-class, suburban life contains elements of ideological critique, Mr. Penn and Mr. Krakauer persuasively place him in a largely apolitical, homegrown tradition of radical, romantic individualism.

An enthusiastic reader (with a special affinity for Tolstoy and Jack London), Chris is in many ways the intellectual heir of 19th-century writer-naturalists like John Muir and especially Henry David Thoreau, whose uncompromising idealism — “rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth” — he takes as a watchword. (Had he survived, Mr. McCandless might well have joined the ranks of latter-day nature writers like Edward Abbey and Bill McKibben.) His credo is perhaps most succinctly stated by Thoreau’s mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, who advised that “the ancient precept, ‘Know thyself,’ and the modern precept, ‘Study Nature,’ become at last one maxim.”

One problem with this strain of American thought is that it sometimes finds expression in self-help nostrums and greeting-card sentiments. “If you want something in life, reach out and grab it,” Chris says to Tracy (Kristen Stewart), a teenage girl who develops a crush on him, collapsing Self-Reliance into something like an advertising slogan. But the movie’s theme, thankfully, is not so simple or so easily summed up in words.

Mr. Penn, even more than Mr. Krakauer, takes the Emersonian dimension of Chris McCandless’s project seriously, even as he understands the peril implicit in too close an identification with nature. The book took pains to defend its young protagonist against the suspicion that he was suicidal, unbalanced or an incompetent outdoorsman, gathering testimony from friends he had made in his last years as evidence of his kindness, his care and his integrity. The film, at some risk of sentimentalizing its hero, goes further, pushing him to the very brink of sainthood. After Chris offers wise, sympathetic counsel to Rainey (Brian Dierker), a middle-aged hippie he has befriended on the road, the older man looks at him with quiet amazement. “You’re not Jesus, are you?” he asks.

Well no, but it’s a comparison that Mr. Penn does not entirely discourage. (Note the final, man of sorrows image of Mr. Hirsch’s face and also an earlier shot of him floating naked in a stream, his arms extended in a familiar cruciform shape.) At the same time, though, “Into the Wild” resists the impulse to interpret Chris’s death as a kind of martyrdom or as the inevitable, logical terminus of his passionate desire for communion with nature.

Instead, with disarming sincerity, it emphasizes his capacity for love, the gift for fellowship that, somewhat paradoxically, accompanied his fierce need for solitude. Though he warns one of his friends against seeking happiness in human relationships — and also rails incoherently against the evils of “society” — Chris is a naturally sociable creature. And “Into the Wild” is populated with marvelous actors — including Mr. Dierker, a river guide and ski-shop owner making his first appearance in a film — who make its human landscape as fascinating and various as its topography.

The source of Chris’s wanderlust, and of the melancholy that tugs at the film’s happy-go-lucky spirit, is traced to his parents (William Hurt and Marcia Gay Harden), whose volatile marriage and regard for appearances begin to seem contemptible to their son. (His feelings for them are explained in voice-over by his younger sister, Carine, who is played by Jena Malone.)

Fleeing from his mother and father, Chris finds himself drawn, almost unwittingly, to parental surrogates: a rowdy grain dealer in South Dakota (Vince Vaughn), a retired military man in the California desert (Hal Holbrook) and Rainey’s companion, Jan (Catherine Keener), who seems both carefree and careworn.

Chris reminds some of these people of their own lost children, but all of them respond to something about him: an open, guileless quality, at once earnest and playful, that Mr. Hirsch conveys with intuitive grace. “You look like a loved kid,” Jan says, and “Into the Wild” bears that out in nearly every scene.

He is loved, not least, by Mr. Penn, who has shown himself, in three previous films (“The Indian Runner,” “The Crossing Guard” and “The Pledge”) to be a thoughtful and skilled director. He still is, but this story seems to have liberated him from the somber seriousness that has been his hallmark as a filmmaker until now. “Into the Wild” is a movie about the desire for freedom that feels, in itself, like the fulfillment of that desire.

Which is not to say that there is anything easy or naïve in what Mr. Penn has done. “Into the Wild” is, on the contrary, alive to the mysteries and difficulties of experience in a way that very few recent American movies have been. There are some awkward moments and infelicitous touches — a few too many Eddie Vedder songs on the soundtrack, for example, when Woody Guthrie, Aaron Copland or dead silence might have been more welcome — but the film’s imperfection, like its grandeur, arises from a passionate, generous impulse that is as hard to resist as the call of the open road.

“Into the Wild” is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). It has profanity, brief nudity and some violent or otherwise upsetting scenes.

INTO THE WILD
Opens today in New York and Los Angeles.

Directed by Sean Penn; written by Mr. Penn, based on the book by Jon Krakauer; director of photography, Eric Gautier; edited by Jay Cassidy; score by Michael Brook with songs and additional music by Eddie Vedder and Kaki King; production designer, Derek R. Hill; produced by Mr. Penn, Art Linson and Bill Pohlad; released by Paramount Vantage. Running time: 140 minutes.

WITH: Emile Hirsch (Christopher McCandless), Marcia Gay Harden (Billie McCandless), William Hurt (Walt McCandless), Jena Malone (Carine), Brian Dierker (Rainey), Catherine Keener (Jan Burres), Vince Vaughn (Wayne Westerberg), Kristen Stewart (Tracy) and Hal Holbrook (Ron Franz).
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rlove3
Posted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:15 pm Reply with quote
*Mr. Lehman* Joined: 26 Oct 2006 Posts: 1102 Location: Asheville, NC
for real man, deadwood is the shiz...start at season 1 and work youe way up and hope that you're not offended by foul language

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BrownEyesBlue
Posted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:36 pm Reply with quote
Old Crow Joined: 10 Aug 2006 Posts: 376
Or whores and graphic fucking scenes.
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therodge
Posted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 9:27 pm Reply with quote
*Law Dog* Joined: 17 Oct 2004 Posts: 6539 Location: Nashville, Tennessee
BrownEyesBlue wrote:
Or whores and graphic fucking scenes.

or foul language Wink

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pittsyltucky
Posted: Fri Sep 21, 2007 6:27 am Reply with quote
*Johnny* Joined: 15 Sep 2006 Posts: 4268 Location: Pigg River District, Pittsylvania County, Virginia
BrownEyesBlue wrote:
Or whores and graphic fucking scenes.


Trixie - is that you??
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kg
Posted: Fri Sep 21, 2007 10:34 am Reply with quote
*Data Miner* Joined: 30 Jun 2007 Posts: 3427
If you wanted to hear foul language, you should have been with me when I realized that Into the Wild is opening today only in NY and LA!
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jahnee
Posted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:48 am Reply with quote
Charlie Joined: 19 Nov 2004 Posts: 680 Location: NW Indiana
Just got these from Netflix..





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